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career research blog

The latest career research insights to grow your career

Filtering by Tag: job crafting

Actively seeking challenges at work boosts engagement

Claire Johnston

New research has shown that actively seeking out challenges at work results in feeling more energetic, focused and dedicated at work, and less bored.  This feeling of being engaged also leads individuals to actively seek out resources which positions individuals to continue seeking out challenges.

Harju, L. K., Hakanen, J. J., & Schaufeli, W. B. (2016). Can job crafting reduce job boredom and increase work engagement? A three-year cross-lagged panel study. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 95, 11-20.

Craft your job to increase your performance

Noemi Nagy

Job crafting means actively altering one's job to better suit one's skills and interests. This type of proactive behavior  leads to higher levels of work engagement and to better job performance, according to a recent longitudinal study authored by researchers from the Netherlands. The results further showed that the effects are more pronounced regarding performance in core tasks than for more discretionary performance (e.g., providing social support at work).

Tims, M., Bakker, A. B., & Derks, D. (2015). Job crafting and job performance: A longitudinal study. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 24(6), 914-928.

 

 

Late-career employees need to take their careers in their own hands

Noemi Nagy

In order to maintain their health, motivation, and work ability, older employees should proactively manage their careers, as researchers from the Netherlands revealed in a recent study. The authors found that by changing tasks and relationships at work (so called job crafting) aging workers could adjust their jobs to their changing goals and motives, thus improving current as well as future person-job fit.

Kooij, D. T. (2015). Successful aging at work: The active role of employees. Work, Aging and Retirement1(4), 309-319.